Course Syllabus

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Syllabus                                          

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Course Description

AP World History: Modern is a college-level course that analyzes global patterns of historical development and exchange from roughly 1200 c.e. to the present. Using primary and secondary sources, AP World History students will track historical change and continuity within and across four periods of study, paying close attention to unifying course themes and accompanying learning objectives. Great emphasis is placed on the honing of historical thinking skills, such as chronological reasoning, comparison, contextualization, argumentation, interpretation, and synthesis. The course culminates with the national AP World History examination, which will be administered in May. Students will earn a weighted grade for this class and, if successful on the national examination, they could receive college credit at their preferred university. 

Course Resources

Textbook:

AMSCO. AP World History Modern (1200 - Present) 1st edition. Perfection Learning

Primary Source Reader:

Stearns, Peter. World History in Documents: A Comparative Reader. 2nd ed. New York: New York University

Press, 2008

Review Guide:

AMSCO. World History: Preparing for the Advanced Placement Examination 2018 Edition. Perfection Learning

Unit Structure:

A typical AP World History: Modern unit will consist of interactive lectures, structured discussion of the assigned

readings, primary source analysis, cooperative group work, class debates, technology-based instruction, essay

skill development, short-answer skill development, map exercises, critical thinking activities, statistical data

analysis, and Socratic Seminars. Some of these activities are showcased below in the detailed course outline.

Finally, each unit will close with assessments consisting of stimulus-based multiple-choice questions, short-answer

questions, a document-based question, and/or a long essay targeting a specific historical thinking skill. 

 

AP World History Geographical Coverage

The five major geographical regions of the AP World History course include Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe,

and Oceania. The AP World History course provides balanced geographical coverage with all five of these

regions represented. 



AP World History Periodization

AP World History course content is studied comparatively within and across the following periods of study:

 

Period 1: c. 1200 to c. 1450

Unit 1: The Global Tapestry (8-10% of exam)

Unit 2: Networks of Exchange (8-10% of exam)

Period 2: c. 1450 to c. 1750

Unit 3: Land-Based Empires (12-15 % of exam)

Unit 4: Transoceanic Interconnections (12-15 % of exam)

Period 3: c. 1750 to c. 1900

Unit 5: Revolutions (12-15 % of exam)

Unit 6:  Consequences of Industrialization (12-15 % of exam)

Period 4: c. 1900 to the present

Unit 7: Global Conflict (8-10% of exam)

Unit 8: Cold War and Decolonization (8-10% of exam)

Unit 9: Globalization (8-10% of exam)

 

AP Historical Thinking Skills

  1. Developments and Processes
  2. Sourcing and Situation
  3. Claims and Evidence in Sources
  4. Contextualization
  5. Making Connections
  6. Argumentation

 

AP World History Course Themes and Corresponding Thematic Learning Objectives

Theme 1: Humans and the Environment (ENV)

Theme 2: Cultural Developments and Interactions (CDI)

Theme 3: Governance (GOV)

Theme 4: Economic Systems (ECN)

Theme 5: Social Interactions and Organizations (SIO)

Theme 6: Technology and Innovation (TEC)

 

Course Overview 

Unit 1: The Global Tapestry (August - Sep. 12) Unit Test: September 13

Unit 2: Networks of Exchange (Sep. 14 - Oct. 2) Unit Test: October 3

Unit 3: Land-Based Empires (Oct. 4 - Oct. 17) Unit Test: October 17

Unit 4: Transoceanic Interconnections (Oct. 21 - Nov. 25) Unit Test: November 26

Unit 5: Revolutions (Dec. 2 - Jan. 9) 

 

MIDTERM EXAM JANUARY  & 10 (Units 1 - 5 Multiple Choice and Writing)

 

Unit 6: Consequences of Industrialization (Jan. 22 - Feb. 11) Unit Test: February 12

Unit 7: Global Conflict (Feb. 13 - Feb. 28) Unit Test: March 2

Unit 8: Cold War and Decolonization  (Mar. 3 - Mar. 25) Unit Test: March 26

Unit 9: Globalization (Mar. 27 - Apr. 9) Unit Test: April 20

AP Exam: 7:30 am Thursday May 14 at Louisburg High School - you must provide your transportation

 

NOTE: Coursework will end in late April to allow three weeks of review for the AP World History Examination. 

**All dates are subject to change due to unforeseen circumstances such as weather or school related incidents.**

Detailed Course Outline

FIRST SEMESTER

 

Unit 1: The Global Tapestry - 1200 c.e. To 1450 c.e.

 

Unit at a Glance:

1.1 Developments in East Asia from c. 1200 to c. 1450

1.2 Developments in Dar al-Islam from c. 1200 to c. 1450

1.3 Developments in South and Southeast Asia from c. 1200 to c. 1450

1.4 State Building in the Americas

1.5 State Building in Africa

1.6 Developments in Europe from c. 1200 to c. 1450

1.7 Comparison in the Period from c. 1200 to c. 1450



Readings:

  • AMSCO Textbook Chapters 1-7
  • Primary Source selections from Stearns
  • Shaffer, Lynda. “Southernization.” Journal of World History 5, no. 1 (Spring 1994): 1–21. 

 

Major Topics:  Rise of Islam; Sunni-Shia division; Islamic politics and culture; diffusion of Islam into West

Africa, Spain, Anatolia, India, and the Indian Ocean basin; medieval Germanic kingdoms in Western Europe;

European feudalism and manorialism; the Byzantine Empire; Catholic and Orthodox Christianity; the Crusades;

Sui, Tang, and Song China; diffusion of Buddhism in Central, East, and Southeast Asia; productivity and

economics in Song China; Confucianism; Daoism; Hinduism; Buddhism and its diffusion into Central, East, and Southeast Asia; Christianity and its diffusion across the Mediterranean Basin, Europe, and East Africa;  Aztec society; Incan society;

 

Theme Activity (SIO-1, 2):

Half of the class will use a graphic organizer to compare and contrast social structures between Classical China

and Classical India. The other half of the class will compare and contrast the role of women within Buddhism and

Christianity. Students will pair up with someone from a different group and discuss the cultural and social aspects

of their work.

 

Skill Development:

  • Students will choose either the Mauryan and Gupta Empires or the Qin and Han Empires and complete a graphic organizer showcasing changes and continuities from one empire to the next. 
  • Students will analyze images of Mayan hieroglyphics, murals, and monumental architecture of Teotihuacan, and Moche pottery.
  • Students will determine key ethical concepts and cultural values from the reading and analysis of an excerpt from the Bhagavad-Gita in:
    • “The Indian Epic Tradition: The Bhagavad Gita.” In World History in Documents: A Comparative Reader, edited by Peter N. Stearns, 36–43. New York: New York University Press, 1998. Originally published in Franklin Edgerton, trans., The Bhagavad Gita (New York: Harper, 1944).
  • In a writing assignment, students will compare differing scholarly interpretations of the Crusades using excerpts from the following secondary sources that showcase opposite perspectives: [CR7] 
    • Runciman, Steven. A History of the Crusades, Vol. I The First Crusade and the Foundations of the Kingdom of Jerusalem. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1987. 
    • Madden, Thomas F. “Crusade Propaganda,” The National Review, November 2, 2001.

Essay Practice:

  • Students will create a thesis that establishes a historically defensible and evaluative claim in response to a prompt and then brainstorm a bulleted list of evidence in support of the thesis; students will turn this list into a sample body paragraph.
  • Students will construct a paragraph analyzing similarities or differences between Egypt and Mesopotamia in terms of culture, economics, politics, social structures, or environmental interaction.
  • Introduction to the AP World History Short-Answer Question (SAQ).

 

Major Assessments:

  1. Quiz 
  2. One SAQ
  3. Personal Progress check to be completed via AP Classroom and submitted to the teacher upon completion BEFORE the end of the unit

 

Unit 2: Networks of Exchange - 1200 c.e. To 1450 c.e.

 

Unit at a Glance:

2.1 The Silk Roads

2.2 The Mongol Empire and the Making of the Modern World

2.3 Exchange in the Indian Ocean

2.4 Trans-Saharan Trade Routes

2.5 Cultural Consequences of Connectivity

2.6 Environmental Consequences of Connectivity

2.7 Comparison of Economic Exchange

 

Readings:

  • AMSCO Textbook Chapters 8-14
  • Primary Source selections from Stearns
  • Pocha, Jehangir S. “Mongolia Sees Genghis Khan’s Good Side,” New York Times, May 10, 2005.
  • Frazier, Ian. “Invaders: Destroying Baghdad,” New Yorker, April 25, 2005

 

Major Topics:  Rise of the Mongols; Mongol Khanates; trade and exchange during Mongol rule; interregional trade along the Silk Road, Trans-Saharan, Mediterranean, and Indian Ocean routes; Heian Japan; Islamic Ghana, Mali and Songhai; and Zheng He and the Ming presence in the Indian Ocean global trade of silver, sugar, fur, and other commodities; and connections and comparisons between the Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific Ocean networks. 

 

Theme Activity (ECN - 4, 5):

Students will complete maps of the Silk, Trans-Saharan, Mediterranean, and Indian Ocean trade routes detailing cities along the routes as well as products traded

 

Skill Development:

  • Students will use the Mongol articles by Pocha and Frazier to isolate differing points of view on Genghis Khan, as well as track how perceptions have changed over time
  • Match and Claims Evidence activity - how to support claims with evidence (Page 53 of course framework)

Essay Practice:

  • Using the scoring criteria, students will learn how to write a long essay and practice prompt analysis for the following targeted skills: comparison and causation.
  • Collaborative SAQ work.

 

Major Assessments:

  1. Quiz
  2. Two SAQs
  3. Time Period Test
  4. Full long essay with comparison as the targeted skill
  5. Personal Progress check to be completed via AP Classroom and submitted to the teacher upon completion BEFORE the test

 

Unit 3: Land Based Empires - 1450 c.e. to 11750 c.e.

 

Unit at a Glance:

3.1 Empires Expand

3.2 Empires: Administration

3.3 Empires: Belief Systems

3.4 Comparison in Land-Based Empires

 

Readings:

    • AMSCO Textbook Chapters 15-18
    • Primary Source selections from Stearns

  • The Turkish Letters 1555-1562 by Ogier Ghiselin de Busbecq

  • Description of Timbuktu by  Leo Africanus (1526)

  • The 95 Theses by Martin Luther

Major Topics:  Ottoman Empire; Mughal Empire; Ming and Qing Dynasties; Tokugawa Japan; the Russian Empire; Rise of Islam; Sunni-Shia division; Islamic politics and culture; Protestant Reformation and a break from existing Christian traditions; Sikhism in South Asia and interactions between Hinduism and Islam; Salaried Samurai and cetralized power; and Divine Right.

 

Theme Activity (GOV, CDI - 1, 2, 4):

Students will read short excerpts describing rulers of the Ottoman and Songhay empires from the Description of Timbuktu and The Turkish Letters. They will read, identify, and describe the historical context for the developments described. They will reread each text and highlight similarities in methods and rulers used to legitimize and consolidate power

 

Skill Development:

  • Students will read short excerpts from the 95 Theses and paraphrase it with a partner. Students will pair up and work on different sourcing elements (point of view, purpose, situation, or audience). After this, they will share out how their elements might have affected Luther’s interpretation of the Catholic Church.

 

Essay Practice:

  • Using the scoring criteria, students will learn how to write the DBQ essay. 
  • Students will construct theses and create arguments using evidence from provided documents.
  • Collaborative SAQ work.

Major Assessments:

  1. Quiz 
  2. Two SAQs
  3. LEQ with Causation as the targeted skill
  4. Shortened DBQ essay
  5. Personal Progress check to be completed via AP Classroom and submitted to the teacher upon completion BEFORE the end of the unit

 

Unit 4: Transoceanic Interconnections c. 1450 to c. 1750

 

Unit at a Glance:

4.1 Technological Innovations from 1450 to 1750

4.2 Exploration: Causes and Events from 1450 to 1750

4.3 Columbian Exchange

4.4 Maritime Empires Established

4.5 Maritime Empires Maintained and Developed

4.6 Internal and External Challenges to State Power in 1450 - 1750

4.7 Changing Social Hierarchies from 1450 to 1750

4.8 Continuity and Change from 1450 to 1750

Readings:

  • AMSCO Textbook Chapters 19-26
  • Primary Source selections from Stearns
  • Flynn, Dennis O. and Arturo Giráldez. “Born with a ‘Silver Spoon’: The Origin of World Trade in 1571.” Journal of World History 6, no. 2 (1995): 201–221.
  • Kramer, Alan, Toleration in the World History of Religions. World History Connected 12.2 (2015)

 

Major Topics:  Iberian maritime expansion; contact and conquest of the Americas; the Columbian Exchange;

social structure and syncretism in colonial America; colonial comparisons: Spanish, Portuguese, British, and

French colonies; Atlantic slave trade; politics and conflict in West Africa; the Atlantic System; plantation

societies in the colonial Americas;  Tokugawa Japan; the Russian Empire; global trade of silver, sugar, fur, and other commodities; and connections and comparisons between the Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific Ocean networks; Religious diversity in the Mughal and Ottoman empires

 

Theme Activity (ENV - 3, 5):

Students will analyze the demographic effects of diseases and crops that were part of the Columbian Exchange.

Skill Development:

  • Students will work in groups to identify the primary thesis posited by Flynn and Giráldez in their “Silver Spoon” article, as well as the traditional arguments regarding the global silver trade that they are seeking to counter. After discussion, students will compare the effects of the global silver trade on China, Japan, and Spain. Students will also track continuities and changes in the global silver trade from 1450 to 1750. They will develop their own theses on comparing the effects of the silver trade and write an essay using evidence from “Silver Spoon.” 
  • Students will examine and compare a collection of sixteenth through eighteenth century maps of the Atlantic Ocean from the Ransom Library website to investigate shifting understandings of the Atlantic World.
  • Students will read the introduction of “Toleration in the World History if Religions” by Alan Kramer and use their textbook to compile evidence from the period 1250 - 1750 that supports AND refutes Kramer’s claim about toleration. Students will then debate about the scope of religious tolerance in the period.

Essay Practice:

  • Using the scoring criteria, students will learn how to write a long essay and practice prompt analysis for the following targeted skills: continuity/change over time and periodization. 
  • Students will brainstorm examples of contextualization and synthesis for specific prompts.

Major Assessments:

  1. Quiz 
  2. Four SAQs
  3. Long essay with continuity and change over time as the targeted skill
  4. Long essay with periodization as the targeted skill
  5. Time Period Test
  6. Personal Progress check to be completed via AP Classroom and submitted to the teacher upon completion BEFORE the test

 

Unit 5: Revolutions c. 1750 to c. 1900

 

Unit at a Glance:

5.1 The Enlightenment

5.2 Nationalism and Revolutions in the Period from 1750 to 1900

5.3 Industrial Revolution Begins

5.4 Industrialization Spreads in the Period from 1750 to 1900

5.5 Technology of the Industrial Age

5.6 Industrialization: Government’s Role from 1750 - 1900

5.7 Economic Developments and Innovations in the Industrial Age

5.8 Reactions to the Industrial Economy from 1750 to 1900

5.9 Society and the Industrial Age

5.10 Continuity and Change in the Industrial Age

Readings:

    • AMSCO Textbook Chapters 27-36
    • Primary Source selections from Stearns
    • “The Declaration of Independence”
    • “Declaration of the Rights of Man and the Citizen”
    • “The Jamaica Letter”

  • The Condition of the Working-Class in England in 1844 by Friedrich Engles

Major Topics: Scientific Revolution; the Enlightenment; the Seven Years’ War; the American Revolution; th French Revolution; the Haitian Revolution; Revolutions in Latin America; the Industrial Revolution; industrial society and material life; social class dynamics in Industrial societies; nineteenth-century reform movements feminism; rise of nationalism; Ottoman decline and reform; struggles in Russia’s multinational state; the Qing Dynasty and its handling of domestic and foreign pressures; the Meiji Restoration; decline of Atlantic slavery; and industrial-era migration and indentured servitude. 

 

Theme Activity (GOV - 2, 3, 4):

Students will use a graphic organizer to compare the specific origins, characteristics, and consequences of the Chinese Self-Strengthening Movement and the Ottoman Tanzimat Movement that developed as responses to imperialistic pressure by foreign states.

Theme Activity (ECN - 1, 2, 5)

Students will analyze statistical data from graphs, charts, and tables to reach conclusions regarding global

production and migration patterns during the Industrial Revolution. 

 

Skill Development:

  • Students will examine “The Declaration of Independence,” the Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen,” and the “Letter From Jamaica” and in small groups will discuss questions relating to historical context, authors’ argument, compare and contrast the arguments, and the documents’ impact on the course of human history
  • Students will read The Condition of the Working-Class in England in 1844 and the preface to the Wheelan and Co. business directory, 1852 and will discuss the differences in the descriptions; how the POV, purpose, and intended audience might explain the differences and which description they believe is the most accurate and why

Essay Practice:

  • A DBQ will be broken down into parts, with students working in groups to analyze one document’s historical context, audience, purpose, and point of view. Students will present their extended analysis to the class, and the class as a whole will discuss possible ways to organize a proper response to the prompt.
  • Students will respond to long essay prompts by creating a thesis and then listing pieces of evidence, contextualization, and synthesis; lists will be crafted into body paragraphs supportive of the thesis.

Major Assessments:

  1. Quiz 
  2. Four SAQs
  3. One LEQ
  4. One DBQ
  5. Personal Progress check to be completed via AP Classroom and submitted to the teacher upon completion BEFORE the midterm exam

 

First Semester Midterm Exam January 11 & 12 during class: 55 stimulus based multiple choice questions; two SAQs; one DBQ

 

**See student handbook for information on exam exemption policies**





SECOND SEMESTER

 

Unit 6: Consequences of Industrialization c. 1750 - c. 1900

 

Unit at a Glance:

6.1 Rationales for Imperialism from 1750 to 1900

6.2 State Expansion from 1750 to 1900

6.3 Indigenous Responses to State Expansion from 1750 to 1900

6.4 Global Economic Development from 1750 to 1900

6.5 Economic Imperialism from 1750 to 1900

6.6 Causes of Migration in an Interconnected World

6.7 Effects of Migration

6.8 Causation in the Imperial Age

 

Readings:

  • AMSCO Textbook Chapters 37 - 45
  • Primary Source selections from Stearns

 

Major Topics: The New Imperialism; effects of imperialism in Sub-Saharan Africa, Asia, Latin America, and Oceania; responses of indigenous peoples to imperialism in Sub-Saharan Africa, Asia, Latin America, and Oceania; 

 

Theme Activity (ENV & ECN - 5, 6):

After 6.6, students will respond to the following question: How do economic, environmental, and technological factors converge to cause migration? Students will peer review a classmate’s work to ensure that they have accurately connected the economy, environment, technology, and migration.

 

Skill Development:

  • In groups, students will examine documents from 2009 AP Exam DBQ on Imperialism in Africa. I will model how to explain the historical significance of purpose in document 1. I will assign each student one of the remaining documents  to read and write a paragraph to explain the relative historical significance of the source’s POV, purpose, historical situation, or audience.

Essay Practice:

  • A DBQ will be broken down into parts, with students working in groups to analyze one document’s historical context, audience, purpose, and point of view. Students will present their extended analysis to the class, and the class as a whole will discuss possible ways to organize a proper response to the prompt.
  • Students will respond to long essay prompts by creating a thesis and then listing pieces of evidence, contextualization, and synthesis; lists will be crafted into body paragraphs supportive of the thesis.

Major Assessments:

  1. Quiz
  2. Four SAQs
  3. One LEQ
  4. One DBQ
  5. Time Period Test
  6. Personal Progress check to be completed via AP Classroom and submitted to the teacher upon completion BEFORE the test

 

Unit 7: Global Conflict c. 1900 to the present

 

Unit at a Glance:

7.1 Shifting Power After 1900

7.2 Causes of World War I

7.3 Conducting World War I

7.4 Economy in the Interwar Period

7.5 Unresolved Tensions After World War I

7.6 Causes of World War II

7.7 Conducting World War II

7.8 Mass Atrocities After 1900

7.9 Causation in Global Conflict

 

Readings:

  • AMSCO Textbook Chapters 46 - 54
  • Primary Source selections from Stearns

 

Major Topics: Collapse of the Qing Dynasty; Mexican Revolution; World War I; Armenian genocide; Bolshevik

Revolution; reactions to the Treaty of Versailles process by non-Europeans; Egypt and Arab Nationalism; Atatürk’s Turkey; Great Depression; rise of fascism and authoritarianism in Italy, Germany, and Japan; World War II in Europe and the Pacific; the Holocaust; rise and fall of apartheid in South Africa; global separatists movements; women’s liberation movements; genocide in Rwanda and Darfur; War in Congo; 

 

Theme Activity (GOV - 1):

Students will examine excerpts from various primary sources to determine which of the four MAIN causes of WWI they align with best

Theme Activity (GOV - 2, 5)

Students will evaluate and compare state-sponsored propaganda from Stalin’s Soviet Union and Mao Zedong’s China. 

Skill Development:

  • Students will analyze causes of the Second World War using the following documents:
    • “The Obersalzberg Speech” by Adolf Hitler.
    • Table: “Unemployment Statistics for Europe, 1929–1933” from Lionel Robbins, The Great Depression (New York: Macmillan, 1936). 
    • Political cartoons showing Japanese aggression and expansion.
  • In a Socratic Seminar, students will analyze the causes and effects of the Second World War using the following documents:
    • Statistical tables showing war casualties by country; preamble of the United Nations Charter of 1945; and the Truman Doctrine speech (1947) from the Yale Law School Lillian Goldman Law Library’s The Avalon Project.
  • Students will synthesize scholarly work from historians, sociologists, cultural anthropologists, and statisticians in the analysis of globalization and its positive and negative elements.
  • Students will practice writing a DBQ essay using the 2014 DBQ on the relationship between Chinese peasants and the Chinese Communist Party.
  • Students will compare domestic reactions to migrants, specifically Turkish migrants to Germany, Indonesian migrants to Australia, and North African migrants to France. 

 

Major Assessments:

  1. Quiz
  2. Four SAQs
  3. One LEQ
  4. One DBQ
  5. Personal Progress check to be completed via AP Classroom and submitted to the teacher upon completion BEFORE the end of the unit

 

Unit 8: Cold War and Decolonization c. 1900 to the present

 

Unit at a Glance:

8.1 Setting the Stage for the Cold War and Decolonization

8.2 The Cold War

8.3 Effects of the Cold War

8.4 Spread of Communism After 1900

8.5 Decolonization after 1900

8.6 Newly Independent States

8.7 Global Resistance to Established Power Structures After 1900

8.8 End of the Cold War

8.9 Causation in the Age of the Cold War and Decolonization

 

Readings:

  • AMSCO Textbook Chapters 55 - 63
  • Primary Source selections from Stearns

 

Main topics: the Cold War; Mao Zedong and Chinese Communism; Stalinist Soviet Union; decolonization; independence and partition in South Asia; Israeli-Palestinian conflict; Iranian Revolution; armed independence struggles and Cold War proxy wars in Africa, Asia, and Latin America; collapse of communism in Russia; Deng Xiaoping’s China; modern globalization; comparing environmentalism movements across the globe; climate change and sea-level rise; religion in the modern age; modernity vs. fundamentalism; and sports and popular culture on a global scale.

 

Skill Development:

  • Students will examine Paul Plaschke’s cartoon of the Yalta Conference (1945) and write a quick reply to the following question: Predict how the cartoon might provide context for understanding Unit 8.
  • Students will be provided with the following claim: The Cold War increased the influence of the United States in the world but ultimately weakened the influence of Russia. Students will discuss their complex argument that supports a claim such as the one above and acknowledges and discusses evidence that contradicts it.

 

Major Assessments:

  1. Quiz
  2. Four SAQs
  3. One LEQ
  4. One DBQ
  5. Personal Progress check to be completed via AP Classroom and submitted to the teacher upon completion BEFORE the end of the unit

 

Unit 9: Globalization c. 1900 to the present

 

Unit at a Glance:

9.1 Advances in Technology and Exchange After 1900

9.2 Technological Advances and Limitations After 1900: Disease

9.3 Technological Advances: Debates About the Environment After 1900

9.4 Economics in the Global Age

9.5 Calls for Reform and Responses after 1900

9.6 Globalized Culture After 1900

9.7 Resistance to Globalization After 1900

9.8 Institutions Developing in a Globalized World

9.9 Continuity and Change in a Globalized World

 

Readings:

  • AMSCO Textbook Chapters 64 - 72
  • Primary Source selections from Stearns

 

Main topics: New modes of communication and transportation; new energy technologies; feminism; the Green Revolution; medical innovations; new diseases and scientific developments; human competition for natural resources; deforestation and desertification; climate change and the increase of greenhouse gases; trend toward free-market economies after the fall of the Soviet Union; World Trade Organization; North American Free Trade Agreement; Association of Southeast Asian Nations; multinational corporations; Civil Rights in the United States; end of apartheid; environmental movements; global consumerism; and United Nations to increase global cooperation.

 

Skill Development:

  • Students will examine the learning objective for 9.9. They will write a claim supported by a paragraph with specific historical evidence that argues for a change but qualifies the argument by acknowledging continuity.
  • Students will debate whether or not a new period of world history has actually begun. Students will then watch David Christian’s TED Talk on Big History, “The history of our world in 18 minutes” (Filmed March 2011. TED video, 17:40), and evaluate the ways in which Big History periodization would differ from that of AP World History.

 

Major Assessments:

  1. Quiz
  2. Four SAQs
  3. One LEQ
  4. One DBQ
  5. Time Period test
  6. Personal Progress check to be completed via AP Classroom and submitted to the teacher upon completion BEFORE the test

Practice AP exam administered one week  prior to the official exam.

 

The AP World History Exam is at: TBD

**You ARE NOT required to take the AP Exam but it is highly recommended. Exam is provided to students free of charge **

 

Part I (worth 60 percent of total grade)

Part A: 55 stimulus-based multiple-choice questions, 55 minutes, 40 percent of total grade

Part B: Four short-answer questions, 50 minutes, 20 percent of total grade

  • Student answers BOTH questions 1 & 2
  • Student selects EITHER question 3 OR 4

 

Part II (worth 40 percent of total grade)

Part A: Document-based question, 60 minutes (includes 15-minute reading period), 25 percent of total grade

Part B: Long essay question selected from four options, 35 minutes, 15 percent of total grade

The exam assesses content from the six course themes

  1. Humans and the Environment
  2. Cultural Developments and Interactions
  3. Governance
  4. Economic Systems
  5. Social Interactions and Organization
  6. Technology and Innovation

 

Exam Weighting

 

Unit 1:

The Global Tapestry

c.1200 to c. 1450 

8-10%

Unit 2:

Network of Exchange

c.1200 - c. 1450

8-10%

Unit 3:

Land-Based Empires

c.1450 - c. 1750

12-15%


Unit 4:

Transoceanic Interconnections

c.1450 - c. 1750

12-15%

Unit 5:

Revolutions

c.1750 - 1900

12-15%

Unit 6:

Consequences of Industrialization

c.1750 - c. 1900

12-15%

Unit 7: 

Global Conflict

c.1900 to present

8-10%

Unit 8:

Cold War and Decolonization

c.1900 to present

8-10%

Unit 9: 

Globalization

c.1900 to present

8-10%

 

Exam Scoring

5 = extremely well qualified

4 = well qualified

3 = qualified

2 = possibly qualified

1 = no recommendation




Bunn High School Specific Information

 

Student Materials:  You should come to class every day with a pen or pencil, paper, your assigned textbook, and either a notebook or binder (1 ½ to 2 in.) to organize notes and handouts that I will be giving you regularly.  Bring them to class EVERY DAY.

 

Grading and Expectations

Grading/Assignments

This is a college level course.  You will be graded as though you are in a college classroom.  This means that the grades that you are accustomed to receiving may not match what you receive in AP World History.  Staying current on readings and putting forth your best effort will lead to the best possible grade in the course.  

 

The grading scale and percentages are as follows:

 

Scale

90-100…A

80-89…..B

70-79…..C

60-69…..D

<60……..F

 

 

Percentage weights

 

Tests/Projects/Essays……………….…….….40%

Quizzes………………................................…20%

Classwork/Homework/Participation……….....40%

 

    • We will have a test at the end of each unit in the course.  
    • You will be quizzed on each chapter of the book as you read prior to us discussing it in class so you should be prepared to read the chapters on your own!!!!  

  • Reading assignments for each unit are listed above

  • Pay close attention to the “Course Overview” for upcoming assessment dates

  • All assignments and dates are subject to change based on class performance and any outside factors impacting the school timeline

  • Quizzes and tests will be multiple choice, just like the AP test in May and the NCFE in June.
  • All tests will be cumulative, which means that there will be new information as well as information from previous units on them.  Keep studying old material because you will see it again!  
  • Essays and any projects that are assigned will also be counted as test grades.
  • Participation in this class is essential.  We will have many class discussions based around the content so reading and understanding are going to be necessary to participate fully.  A student who refuses to participate in class will lose points on their grade.  Come prepared to talk!

 

Classroom Rules

    • Be Prompt – Arrive to class on time.  Any student not in the classroom when the bell rings will receive a tardy.

  • Tardy Policy: The following is our new SCHOOL WIDE POLICY: Students are expected to be in the classroom (passed the door frame) when the bell begins to ring. Consequences for being tardy are outlined in the BHS Student Code of Conduct.

  • Be Prepared – Come to class every day with the required materials and all reading and assignments completed.
  • Be Polite – Treat others students and their personal belongings with respect.

 

Failure to comply with these or any rules listed in the student handbook will be dealt with immediately.  Consequences include a verbal warning, parent contact, and/or referral to administration.

Course Summary:

Date Details